What Is Your Favorite Christmas Cookie?

My favorite Christmas Cookie are the Candy Cane Cookies.   Of course they are one of the harder ones to make and the break but I still love them.  The the 2nd place winner goes to SPRITZ.

Conversation topic of the week for kids:  What is your favorite Christmas Cookie?   HoPumpkin Whoopie Piesw many Christmas cookies do you think you eat at Christmas time?

 Conversation topic of the week for Adults:  What is your favorite Christmas Cookie?  How many cookies do you make?  Did your Mom make Christmas cookies? Share some of your favorite  the recipes.

Conversation Topic of the week for Teens:  What is your favorite Christmas Cookie?   Do you make or decorate Christmas cookies?  Have your best friends over for a Christmas cookie baking party.

I always double the recipe!!

Candy Cane Cookies

2 1/2 cups (325 grams) all purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup (227 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature

1 cup (120 grams) confectioners sugar(powdered or icing)

2 large egg yolks

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract

1/2 teaspoon red liquid food coloring (can use red paste food coloring)

In a bowl whisk flour with salt.

In the bowl of your electric mixer (or with a hand mixer), beat the butter and sugar until creamy. Add the egg yolks and vanilla and almond extracts and beat until combined. Scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Add the flour mixture, in three additions, and beat until you have a smooth dough.

Remove half of the dough from the mixing bowl. To the remaining half add the red food coloring and beat on low speed until well blended. If you find the dough too soft, cover and refrigerate for 30-60 minutes.

Take a walnut sized piece of red dough and a walnut sized piece of white dough. Separately, roll each color on a lightly floured surface, into a 4-5 inch (10-12.5 cm) long rope. Place the two ropes side by side, gently press together, and twist the two ropes to form a spiral. Place the cookies on a parchment lined baking sheet, spacing the cookies about 2 inches (5 cm) apart. Shape each cookie into a cane shape by bending one end into a hook shape. (If you find the cookies a little soft, place the baking sheet (with the unbaked cookies) in the refrigerator for about 15 minutes before baking.)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) and place rack in center of oven.

Bake cookies for about 8 -10 minutes or until set and the edges of the cookies are just starting to brown. Do not over bake. Remove from oven and let cookies cool completely on baking sheet. Cover and store in an air tight container for about a week. These cookies can be frozen.

Makes about 30 cookies.

Adapted from the Joy of Baking!

Christmas Cookie

If  you are not a eating at the dinner table type of a family than use car time to talk. Talk talk and talk some more! Talking actually creating conversation at the dinner table is becoming a thing of the past. Talking with you children each time you sit down for dinner teaches them that talking to Mom or Dad is easy and fun. This dinner talk with children will grow and you will teach them how to communicate or confide in adults so when they have a question or problem they naturally can talk about it. For adults it makes life more interesting, it builds a relationship and it’s fun. Sitting down, as a family, to have dinner together is a thing of the past.

In fact, according to a survey by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, the number of U.S. families who do eat dinner together is actually on the rise. Families who eat together have better overall nutrition. The kids get better grades in school and are less likely to take drugs, smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol than those from families who rarely eat dinner together. But perhaps the biggest benefit of eating family dinners is that parents are fully engaged with their kids. Not sure how to get your kids to open up? Use Eat Create Design’s daily dinner topic to get things started.

Kim Kalan

MINNEAPOLIS, MN – Kim Kalan, Co-Founder and CEO of “One Cookie”,” is a renaissance woman when it comes to her career. She has bought and sold numerous companies. She has participated in Mensa think tank groups. She has brokered countless international transactions to the tune of millions of dollars over the years. Through all these experiences, there has been one thing that has motivated her all along the way: creating jobs. Her current venture very likely could be the pinnacle of this lifelong agenda.